Making Diversity and Inclusion a Priority in Your Credit Union

Research and experience continue to make the case for improved diversity and inclusion in the workplace.  The credit union movement can benefit greatly from focusing on diversity and inclusion as they make plans for continual growth, innovation, and talent acquisition in the marketplace.  Jimese Harkley, COO of DiverCity Solutions, mentions some ways that inclusion impacts the bottom line, “Inclusion improves workplace relations among teams and builds trust within interdepartmental relations. It builds more innovative work teams, improves organizational problem-solving, and improves member service.”

Jimese Harkley,  DiverCity Solutions

Recent studies help back up these claims by showing that inclusive organizations can ultimately enjoy better financial performance.  In a 2015 report by global consulting firm McKinsey & Company titled Diversity Matters, the research found that companies that exhibit gender and ethnic diversity are, respectively, 15 percent and 35 percent more likely to financially outperform those that do not.  The study found that a diverse workplace helps to attract and retain top talent, strengthen customer orientation, increase employee satisfaction, improve decision making, and enhance the company’s image.

How are credit unions doing with diversity and inclusion?  Harkley notes, “It is evident that credit unions have gotten the message on diversity, equity, and inclusion” But continues that, “unfortunately, there are few organizations that go beyond the baseline requirements.”

The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) has focused more on credit union diversity recently, and in May 2015 even issued an interagency policy on standards for assessing diversity policies and practices in credit unions.  NCUA states that, “Credit unions were founded on the premise of people helping people.  It makes good business sense to have members, managers, and employees reflect the community credit unions service and for credit unions to serve diverse segments within their communities.”  NCUA also produced a voluntary diversity self-assessment questionnaire to help credit unions assess existing policies and practices, and then find opportunities for improvement.

NCUA and Harkley agree that the success of these policies and practices starts with leadership’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.  The Board of Directors and Senior Management have the responsibility to promote a culture of diversity and inclusion through their development and support of strong policies and practices.  But, Harkley also notes that young professionals can lead from any position on this matter and help encourage a dialogue to improve diversity and inclusion within the credit union.  She encourages young professionals to, “Research current policies and procedures.  If the credit union has no policies, or if the policies are inconsistent with credit union values, start by asking questions.  Use this inquisitiveness to promote positive change and encourage leadership to be more vocal about their intentions to be inclusive.”

Credit unions can do more to lead the way by adopting and encouraging these practices that promote growth, innovation, and talent acquisition.  For more ideas on how to start or continue this dialogue, the Mountain West Young Credit Union Professionals will present a free webinar titled The Inclusion Effect: The Benefits of a Fair and Equitable Workplace, featuring Jimese Harkley from DiverCity Solutions.

Join us on January 25, 2018 at 11:00 AM Mountain Time by registering at following link: The Inclusion Effect: The Benefits of a Fair and Equitable Workplace

About Brian Lee

Brian Lee is the Chief Financial Officer at Landings Credit Union in Tempe, AZ. He is a member of the MWCUA and CUNA Young Professional Committees. Brian is also a Credit Union Development Educator and is passionate about the credit union movement.

 

 

 

 

 

Mountain West Young Professionals Make Their Mark on the Annual Convention

The sun ascended over the desert as 20 energetic young professionals (YP’s) descended upon the 2017 MWCUA Annual Meeting and Convention in Scottsdale.  These YP’s joined nearly 300 credit union professionals and volunteers from Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming for three days of impactful discussion, training, and networking.

The YP’s kicked off the conference off with an early morning on the TPC Scottsdale golf course volunteering in support of the Foundation’s golf tournament.  You may have seen them inviting you to smack a marshmallow, play blackjack, or even cheering you on as you teed off on the infamous 16th hole.

After taking care of their sunburns (especially our friends from CO and WY), the YP’s cleaned up nicely to attend the Mountain West Annual Business Meeting.  There, they were introduced to the friendly banter between MWCUA Board Chairman John Uchida and Association President Scott Earl.  The YP’s were even introduced to the conference attendees with a special “shout out” from the Chairman.

Keynote speaker Colonel Jill Morgenthaler told the crowd of her journey and the challenges she faced as a woman of many firsts in the military, and we all learned the proper use of “Hooah!”.  After being motivated by the Colonel, the YP’s got out their business cards and cruised the trade show floor to network, learn about some amazing vendors, and collect swag.  The YP’s then moved on to a private reception hosted by the good people at CUNA Mutual.  They had the opportunity to network with each other as well as with CUNA Mutual’s Gerry Singleton, Dr. Dan Santangelo, Brandi Stankovic, Austin DeBey, and Chris Kemm.

The next morning brought another gorgeous Arizona sunrise and a morning meeting presented by the Arizona Youth Involvement Network (AYIN).  AYIN committee members presented the cooperative principles to the group and asked the YP’s to come up with those principles that were most important to them.  They then joined the rest of the attendees for a presentation on innovation by John Best.  He taught that “Innovation is culture + passion and is fueled by discipline”.

Gerry Singleton then encouraged the YP’s in their morning session to be a courageous leader in a cooperative world.  The YP’s were given a taste of the Credit Union Development Educator program as they had to determine the mission of the credit union movement and the role they play in it.  He presented the thought from Ralph Waldo Emerson that “Doing well is the result of doing good” and that the movement is much bigger than an individual credit union.

The YP’s joined the rest of the conference for some enlightening afternoon sessions, and then put on their fancy clothes for an evening full of delicious food, awards, more friendly banter, fire dancers, and even a hot air balloon ride.

After getting to bed early, the YP’s awoke and were treated to a lively discussion on leadership with Brandi Stankovic.  Brandi challenged the YP’s to determine how they will make a difference for their members.  After teaching that intentions do not equal impact, the YP’s put pen to paper and wrote down what they would start doing today to “get over it and get after it”.

The conference ended with some inspiration courtesy of Alex Sheen, founder of Because I Said I Would.  His story of how he turned tragedy into a movement motivated everyone to determine how they could make promises, and keep them, to make this world just a little better.

These 20 YP’s were given an incredible opportunity to take part in a well-planned conference full of takeaways, inspiration, and impressions.  They all made commitments to go back to their credit unions and do their part to become leaders in this movement.

The MWCUA Young Professional Committee would like to thank the Association and Foundation for their support to help attract, engage, and retain young professionals in the credit union movement.  Special thanks to all those involved in making this event possible including, but not limited to: Nicole Brusewitz, Gerry Singleton, Brandi Stankovic, AYIN, Dr. Dan Santagelo, Chris Kemm, Austin DeBey, and the credit union CEO’s that encouraged and allowed their YP’s to attend.